Universities in crisis: police, militarization, protest and universities in Perú

Hosted by University of Cambridge PhD student Maria Fernanda Rodriguez, in solidarity with the scholars and students currently in struggle against state violence in Perú, this panel features Peruvian scholars Prof Cecilia Méndez (UC Santa Barbara) and Dr Patricia Oliart (Newcastle University). The event is co-hosted by KPP, CLAREC and the Universities in Crisis project.   Perú is facing a significant political crisis during which many … Continue reading Universities in crisis: police, militarization, protest and universities in Perú

‘Dominant or dominating? Imaginaries of higher education in Turkey and Northern Syria’. By Jee Rubin and Lakshmi Bose

This paper examines the ways in which administrators, academics and students living under conditions of authoritarianism come to imagine the university’s political possibilities and horizons. To this aim, we first consider how alternative imaginaries are constructed and contained at Boğaziçi University, where the parameters of political possibility are pre-figured both by the current ruling regime … Continue reading ‘Dominant or dominating? Imaginaries of higher education in Turkey and Northern Syria’. By Jee Rubin and Lakshmi Bose

‘UK higher education, neoliberal meritocracy, and the culture of the new capitalism: A computational linguistics analysis’. By Michele Martini & Susan L. Robertson

Drawing on empirical data this paper explores how a new articulation of meritocracy has emerged over time in UK Higher Education. To this end, we analyze the five major HE reports produced in the UK between 1997–2010. The proposed analytical design combines semantic mapping, natural language processing (NLP), and critical discourse analysis to identify the … Continue reading ‘UK higher education, neoliberal meritocracy, and the culture of the new capitalism: A computational linguistics analysis’. By Michele Martini & Susan L. Robertson

‘Globalisation, Culture and Higher Education’. Book chapter by Susan L Robertson, Mariano Rosenzvaig & Elizabeth Maber

What does it mean to take ‘the cultural turn’ seriously, and in our case, to engage it in research on globalisation and higher education?  In this book chapter, we argue that this involves adding a cultural lens to engage with, rather than depart from, an analysis of the global political economy of higher education. This … Continue reading ‘Globalisation, Culture and Higher Education’. Book chapter by Susan L Robertson, Mariano Rosenzvaig & Elizabeth Maber

‘Crises and the Production of Multiple Privatisations in UK Higher Education’ By Susan L. Robertson and Michele Martini

This paper examines the production of multiple trajectories of privatisations in UK higher education over the past two decades. Using corpus linguistics and critical discourse analysis as methodologies, we show how six key higher education reports since 1997 discursively set into motion those structural selectivities (Jessop, 2005) which are strategically selective of different modalities of privatisation and their social relations (Martini & Robertson, 2021).

Publication: Conflict, insecurity and the political economies of higher education: The case of Syria post-2011

This paper stems from a 12-month collaborative enquiry between a group of Syrian academics in exile in Turkey and academics from the University of Cambridge into the state of Syrian Higher Education after the onset of the conflict in 2011. The purpose of this paper is to draw on 19 open-ended interviews with exiled Syrian … Continue reading Publication: Conflict, insecurity and the political economies of higher education: The case of Syria post-2011

‘Education cleavages, or market society and the rise of authoritarian populism?’. By Susan L. Robertson & Matias Nestore

This paper explores how, in what ways, and with what outcomes, deep structural transformations have reconstituted higher education in England, and are deeply implicated in the rise of authoritarian populism. We focus particularly on the ways in which our understandings and lived experiences of class, social mobility, meritocracy, social inequality, and social justice have been transformed.